Category Archives: Programming

TSP Symposium 2013 Keynotes to Focus on Quality Practices for Critical Software

The Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has announced the slate of software engineering thought-leaders who will serve as keynote speakers for the Team Software Process (TSP) Symposium 2013. Held in Dallas, Texas, on September 16-19, the TSP Symposium 2013 keynote line-up includes Bill Curtis, senior vice president and chief scientist with Cast Software; Enrique Ibarra, senior vice president of technology of the Mexican Stock Exchange (BMV); and Robert Behler, chief operating officer of the SEI.

The symposium theme, When Software Really Matters, explores the idea that when product quality is critical, high-quality practices are the best way to achieve it.

“When a software system absolutely must work correctly, quality must be built in from the start. A disciplined approach to quality also offers the benefit of lower lifecycle costs. The TSP promotes the application of practices that lead to superior, high-quality products,” said James McHale, TSP Symposium 2013 technical chair. “Our keynote speakers and representatives from industry and government organizations from around the world will share how using TSP helps organizations build quality in from the start when there’s no room for error.”

  • Curtis will assert that the stakes for software-caused operational problems are now larger than ever, approaching a half-billion dollars per incident. Every other aspect of the business is managed by numbers, including IT operations. Software lags behind, however, because the culture of craftsmanship still prevails. Curtis’s talk will challenge that culture: Quality measurement will be challenged for under-measuring non-functional, structural quality, the cause of many operational disasters. Productivity measurement will be challenged for not penalizing baselines when rework is shifted into future releases as technical debt. Software measurement will be challenged to better express outcomes in terms that justify investments for improving quality. The word “quality” will be challenged as the wrong way to frame the argument. Curtis will propose a measurement stack or measurement pyramid to help translate software numbers to business numbers. At the foundation of this pyramid are the Personal Software Process (PSP) and TSP.
  • Ibarra will detail the Mexican Stock Exchange’s (BMV) broad plan of technological renovation that included migration to a new state-of-the-art data center and creating new operational systems with better functionalities and quality attributes. Since 2005, the BMV, which is responsible for operating the cash and derivatives market of the country and is the only exchange in Mexico, has faced the constant challenge of accommodating an exponential growth of demand for its transactional services as well as pressure from the market to offer services with better response times and functionalities. One of the most challenging software projects included in this technological renovation plan was the redesign and construction of the operational system known as the trading engine, which has strict and ambitious requirements for speed (latency), scalability, and continuous availability. The new system, which was to be designed and built internally, and the project were called MoNeT. The BMV had two goals for MoNeT: making sure a carefully considered and reviewed system architecture was in place prior to building the system and adopting a software development process that maximizes the quality of the new system and ensures that it complies with its intended quality attributes. Ibarra will describe the most relevant aspects of the MoNeT project, its performance in production, and the business impact it had on the BMV.
  • Behler, one of only 139 individuals qualified as pilots of the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird aircraft, will describe his experience flying the fastest, most physically demanding aircraft in the world to gather vital data during the Cold War and the teamwork approach it took to develop the aircraft. The SR-71 was developed in the 1960s with myriad sophisticated sensors used to acquire highly specific intelligence data. The aircraft remains an icon of American aerospace engineering to this day and is considered to be the most effective reconnaissance aircraft in history.

In addition to the keynote speakers, substantial technical program, and organized networking events, the TSP Symposium 2013 also offers practitioners an in-depth learning opportunity with full-day tutorials on introductory and advanced TSP concepts.

“I am very excited about this year’s lineup of keynote speakers and technical presenters. The symposium should be stimulating with presentations on a broad array of topics related to quality-focused software development. It is also an excellent way for participants to network and exchange diverse ideas about how they have used the PSP/TSP approach to achieve their software quality goals,” said Mark Kasunic, Symposium co-chair.

5 Coding Hacks to Reduce GC Overhead

In this post we’ll look at five ways in roomates efficient coding we can use to help our garbage collector CPU spend less time allocating and freeing memory, and reduce GC overhead. Often Long GCs can lead to our code being stopped while memory is reclaimed (AKA “stop the world”). Duke_GCPost

Some background

The GC is built to handle large amounts of allocations of short-lived objects (think of something like rendering a web page, where most of the objects allocated Become obsolete once the page is served).

The GC does this using what’s called a “young generation” – a heap segment where new objects are allocated. Each object has an “age” (placed in the object’s header bits) defines how many roomates collections it has “survived” without being reclaimed. Once a certain age is reached, the object is copied into another section in the heap called a “survivor” or “old” generation.

The process, while efficient, still comes at a cost. Being Able to reduce the number of temporary allocations can really help us increase of throughput, especially in high-scale applications.

Below are five ways everyday we can write code that is more memory efficient, without having to spend a lot of time on it, or reducing code readability.

1. Avoid implicit Strings

Strings are an integral part of almost every structure of data we manage. Being much heavier than other primitive values, they have a much stronger impact on memory usage.

One of the most important things to note is that Strings are immutable. They can not be modified after allocation. Operators such as “+” for concatenation actually allocate a new String containing the contents of the strings being joined. What’s worse, is there’s an implicit StringBuilder object that is allocated to actually do the work of combining them.

For example –

a = a + b; / / a and b are Strings
The compiler generates code comparable behind the scenes:

StringBuilder temp = new StringBuilder (a).
temp.append (b);
a = temp.toString () / / a new string is allocated here.
/ / The previous “a” is now garbage.
But it gets worse.

Let’s look at this example –

String result = foo () + arg;
result + = boo ();
System.out.println (“result =” + result);
In this example we have 3 StringBuilders allocated in the background – one for each plus operation, and two additional Strings – one to hold the result of the second assignment and another to hold the string passed into the print method. That’s 5 additional objects in what would otherwise Appear to be a pretty trivial statement.

Think about what happens in real-world scenarios such as generating code a web page, working with XML or reading text from a file. Within a nested loop structures, you could be looking at Hundreds or Thousands of objects that are implicitly allocated. While the VM has Mechanisms to deal with this, it comes at a cost – one paid by your users.

The solution: One way of reducing this is being proactive with StringBuilder allocations. The example below Achieves the same result as the code above while allocating only one StringBuilder and one string to hold the final result, instead of the original five objects.

StringBuilder value = new StringBuilder (“result =”);
value.append (foo ()). append (arg). append (boo ());
System.out.println (value);
By being mindful of the way Strings are implicitly allocated and StringBuilders you can materially reduce the amount of short-term allocations in high-scale code locations.

2. List Plan capacities

Dynamic collections such as ArrayLists are among the most basic dynamic structures to hold the data length. ArrayLists and other collections such as HashMaps and implemented a Treemaps are using the underlying Object [] arrays. Like Strings (Themselves wrappers over char [] arrays), arrays are also immutable. Becomes The obvious question then – how can we add / put items in their collections if the underlying array’s size is immutable? The answer is obvious as well – by allocating more arrays.

Let’s look at this example –

List <Item> <Item> items = new ArrayList ();

for (int i = 0; i <len; i + +)
Item item = readNextItem ();
items.add (item);
The value of len Determines the ultimate length of items once the loop finishes. This value, however, is unknown to the constructor of the ArrayList roomates allocates a new Object array with a default size. Whenever the internal capacity of the array is exceeded, it’s replaced with a new array of sufficient length, making the previous array of garbage.

If you’re executing the loop Welcome to Thunderbird times you may be forcing a new array to be allocated and a previous one to be collected multiple times. For code running in a high-scale environment, these allocations and deallocations are all deducted from your machine’s CPU cycles.

Variabel di Shell Script

In the previous issue we’ve become acquainted with a shell script and managed to create a very simple shell script. If we look, we did not perform any processing on the shell script. We only show a message on the screen and execute commands on the shell through shell script. What if we want to make the program more interactive shell script?

As with any programming language, shell script also serves to recognize the variables that can hold information temporarily for a variety of purposes, for example to compute or determine the output results. You may make as much as possible or use a variable in your shell script. Name the variables are independent, large and small letters should, but make it easier to remember, make it a habit to create standard rules in the manufacture of the variable name. At this writing, all variables will be written in lowercase.

Variables can be divided into two types, namely environment variables and user variables. Environment variables are variables that have been previously determined as a part of the shell used (bash). By default, the name of this variable using all capital letters. Example of this is the $ USER variable that will contain the user name you are currently using, $ HOME home directory which contains the address of the user that is used, and so forth. To display the entire value of an existing environment variable, you can use the set command in the terminal (Figure 1). User variable is the variable name specified by the user themselves and not by the shell used.

Variables can be accessed by using the dollar sign ($) before the variable name, for example, we have a variable named “my name”, to access the value stored in the variable, we use the $ my name. To give value to a variable, we use the sign “=” is immediately followed by the value we give without any spaces, for example my name = Willy. What if the value that we want to give is a sentence? Use double quotes as the opening and closing value of a variable, such as my name = “Willy Sudiarto Raharjo”. For example, see listing 1 and try running on your computer. Seen that the value of the variable Sudiarto be regarded as a command and not part of the variable because it is not enclosed in double quotation marks. Please be careful in giving a value to a variable.

You can combine environment variables and user variables in a shell script is the same, as in listing 2. What if want to write a message using the $ character, such as “It cost me $ 15”? If we are not careful, it could be a shell script would be wrong to interpret the information that we provide and try to take the value of variable 1 (which will not contain any) and display it as a “price 5”. To fix this, use the escape character to indicate that the next character will be recognized as a regular character and not as a substitute for a variable, which marks the backslash “\” as in listing 3.

One character that needs more attention is the backtick character “` “(position number 1 on the left side your keyboard) because this character has a special function in shell programming, which is able to accommodate the output of a shell command in a variable. As an example, we will hold the result of the date command into a variable date and display its contents using the echo command as in listing 4.

To be able to receive input from the user and store it into a variable, we can use the read function is followed by the name of the variable that we want to use to store the values ​​as in Example 5 listings.

Integrating C++ with QML


Qt Quick’s QML language makes it easy to do many things, especially fancy animated user interfaces. However, some things either can’t be done or are not suitable for implementing in QML, such as:

  1. Getting access to functionality outside of the QML/JavaScript environment.
  2. Implementing performance critical functions where native code is desired for efficiency.
  3. Large and/or complex non-declarative code that would be tedious to implement in JavaScript.

As we’ll see, Qt makes it quite easy to expose C++ code to QML. In this blog post I will show an example of doing this with a small but functional application.

The example is written for Qt 5 and uses the Qt Quick Components so you will need at least Qt version 5.1.0 to run it.


To expose a C++ type having properties, methods, signals, and/or slots to the QML environment, the basic steps are:

  1. Define a new class derived from QObject.
  2. Put the Q_OBJECT macro in the class declaration to support signals and slots and other services of the Qt meta-object system.
  3. Declare any properties using the Q_PROPERTY macro.
  4. Call qmlRegisterType() in your C++ main program to register the type with the Qt Quick engine.

For all the details I refer you to the Qt documentation section Exposing Attributes of C++ Types to QML and the Writing QML Extensions with C++ tutorial.

Ssh Key Generator

For our code example, we want a small application that will generate ssh public/private key pairs using a GUI. It will present the user with controls for the appropriate options and then run the program ssh-keygen to generate the key pair.

I implemented the user interface using the new Qt Quick Controls since it was intended as a desktop application with a desktop look and feel. I initially developed the UX entirely by running the qmlscene program directly on the QML source.

The UI prompts the user for the key type, the file name of the private key to generate and an optional pass phrase, which needs to be confirmed.

The C++ Class

Now that have the UI, we will want to implement the back end functionality. You can’t invoke an external program directly from QML so we have to write it in C++ (which is the whole point of this example application).

First, we define a class that encapsulates the key generation functionality. It will be exposed as a new class KeyGenerator in QML. This is done in the header file KeyGenerator.h below.


#include <QObject>
#include <QString>
#include <QStringList>

// Simple QML object to generate SSH key pairs by calling ssh-keygen.

class KeyGenerator : public QObject
    Q_PROPERTY(QString type READ type WRITE setType NOTIFY typeChanged)
    Q_PROPERTY(QStringList types READ types NOTIFY typesChanged)
    Q_PROPERTY(QString filename READ filename WRITE setFilename NOTIFY filenameChanged)
    Q_PROPERTY(QString passphrase READ filename WRITE setPassphrase NOTIFY passphraseChanged)


    QString type();
    void setType(const QString &t);

    QStringList types();

    QString filename();
    void setFilename(const QString &f);

    QString passphrase();
    void setPassphrase(const QString &p);

public slots:
    void generateKey();

    void typeChanged();
    void typesChanged();
    void filenameChanged();
    void passphraseChanged();
    void keyGenerated(bool success);

    QString _type;
    QString _filename;
    QString _passphrase;
    QStringList _types;

Next, we need to derive our class from QObject. We declare any properties that we want and the associated methods. Notify methods become signals. In our case, we want to have properties for the selected key type, the list of all valid ssh key types, file name and pass phrase. I arbitrarily made the key type a string. It could have been an enumerated type but it would have made the example more complicated.

Incidentally, a new feature of the Q_PROPERTY macro in Qt 5.1.0 is the MEMBER argument. It allows specifying a class member variable that will be bound to a property without the need to implement the setter or getter functions. That feature was not used here.

We declare methods for the setters and getters and for signals. We also declare one slot called generateKey(). These will all be available to QML. If we wanted to export a regular method to QML, we could mark it with Q_INVOCABLE. In this case I decided to make generateKey() a slot since it might be useful in the future but it could have just as easily been an invocable method.

Finally, we declare any private member variables we will need.

C++ Implementation

Now let’s look at the implementation in KeyGenerator.cpp. Here is the source code:

#include <QFile>
#include <QProcess>
#include "KeyGenerator.h"

    : _type("rsa"), _types{"dsa", "ecdsa", "rsa", "rsa1"}


QString KeyGenerator::type()
    return _type;

void KeyGenerator::setType(const QString &t)
    // Check for valid type.
    if (!_types.contains(t))

    if (t != _type) {
        _type = t;
        emit typeChanged();

QStringList KeyGenerator::types()
    return _types;

QString KeyGenerator::filename()
    return _filename;

void KeyGenerator::setFilename(const QString &f)
    if (f != _filename) {
        _filename = f;
        emit filenameChanged();

QString KeyGenerator::passphrase()
    return _passphrase;

void KeyGenerator::setPassphrase(const QString &p)
    if (p != _passphrase) {
        _passphrase = p;
        emit passphraseChanged();

void KeyGenerator::generateKey()
    // Sanity check on arguments
    if (_type.isEmpty() or _filename.isEmpty() or
        (_passphrase.length() > 0 and _passphrase.length() < 5)) {
        emit keyGenerated(false);

    // Remove key file if it already exists
    if (QFile::exists(_filename)) {

    // Execute ssh-keygen -t type -N passphrase -f keyfileq
    QProcess *proc = new QProcess;
    QString prog = "ssh-keygen";
    QStringList args{"-t", _type, "-N", _passphrase, "-f", _filename};
    proc->start(prog, args);
    emit keyGenerated(proc->exitCode() == 0);
    delete proc;

The constructor initializes some of the member variables. For fun, I used the new initializer list feature of C++11 to initialize the _types member variable which is of type QStringList. The destructor does nothing, at least for now, but is there for completeness and future expansion.

Getter functions like type() simply return the appropriate private member variable. Setters set the appropriate variables, taking care to check that the new value is different from the old one and if so, emitting the appropriate signal. As always, please note that signals are created by the Meta Object Compiler and do not need to be implemented, only emitted at the appropriate times.

The only non-trivial method is the slot generateKey(). It does some checking of arguments and then creates a QProcess to run the external ssh-keygen program. For simplicity and because it typically executes quickly, I do this synchronously and block on it to complete. When done, we emit a signal that has a boolean argument that indicates the key was generated and whether it succeeded or not.

QML Code

Now let’s look at the QML code in main.qml:

// SSH key generator UI

import QtQuick 2.1
import QtQuick.Controls 1.0
import QtQuick.Layouts 1.0
import QtQuick.Dialogs 1.0
import com.ics.demo 1.0

ApplicationWindow {
    title: qsTr("SSH Key Generator")

    statusBar: StatusBar {
    RowLayout {
        Label {
            id: status

    width: 369
    height: 166

    ColumnLayout {
        x: 10
        y: 10

        // Key type
        RowLayout {
            Label {
                text: qsTr("Key type:")
            ComboBox {
                id: combobox
                Layout.fillWidth: true
                model: keygen.types
                currentIndex: 2

        // Filename
        RowLayout {
            Label {
                text: qsTr("Filename:")
            TextField {
                id: filename
                implicitWidth: 200
                onTextChanged: updateStatusBar()
            Button {
                text: qsTr("&Browse...")
                onClicked: filedialog.visible = true

        // Passphrase
        RowLayout {
            Label {
                text: qsTr("Pass phrase:")
            TextField {
                id: passphrase
                Layout.fillWidth: true
                echoMode: TextInput.Password
                onTextChanged: updateStatusBar()


        // Confirm Passphrase
        RowLayout {
            Label {
                text: qsTr("Confirm pass phrase:")
            TextField {
                id: confirm
                Layout.fillWidth: true
                echoMode: TextInput.Password
                onTextChanged: updateStatusBar()

        // Buttons: Generate, Quit
        RowLayout {
            Button {
                id: generate
                text: qsTr("&Generate")
                onClicked: keygen.generateKey()
            Button {
                text: qsTr("&Quit")
                onClicked: Qt.quit()


    FileDialog {
        id: filedialog
        title: qsTr("Select a file")
        selectMultiple: false
        selectFolder: false
        selectedNameFilter: "All files (*)"
        onAccepted: {
            filename.text = fileUrl.toString().replace("file://", "")

    KeyGenerator {
        id: keygen
        filename: filename.text
        passphrase: passphrase.text
        type: combobox.currentText
        onKeyGenerated: {
            if (success) {
                status.text = qsTr('<font color="green">Key generation succeeded.</font>')
            } else {
                status.text = qsTr('<font color="red">Key generation failed</font>')

    function updateStatusBar() {
        if (passphrase.text != confirm.text) {
            status.text = qsTr('<font color="red">Pass phrase does not match.</font>')
            generate.enabled = false
        } else if (passphrase.text.length > 0 && passphrase.text.length < 5) {
            status.text = qsTr('<font color="red">Pass phrase too short.</font>')
            generate.enabled = false
        } else if (filename.text == "") {
            status.text = qsTr('<font color="red">Enter a filename.</font>')
            generate.enabled = false
        } else {
            status.text = ""
            generate.enabled = true

    Component.onCompleted: updateStatusBar()

The preceding code is a little long, however, much of the work is laying out the GUI components. The code should be straightforward to follow.

Note that we import com.ics.demo version 1.0. We’ll see where this module name comes from shortly. This makes a new QML type KeyGeneratoravailable and so we declare one. We have access to it’s C++ properties as QML properties, can call it’s methods and act on signals like we do withonKeyGenerated.

A more complete program should probably do a little more error checking and report meaningful error messages if key generation fails (we could easily add a new method or property for this). The UI layout could also be improved to make it properly resizable.

Our main program is essentially a wrapper like qmlscene. All we need to do to register our type with the QML engine is to call:

    qmlRegisterType<KeyGenerator>("com.ics.demo", 1, 0, "KeyGenerator");

This makes the C++ type KeyGenerator available as the QML type KeyGenerator in the module com.ics.demo version 1.0 when it is imported.

Typically, to run QML code from an executable, in the main program you would create a QGuiApplication and a QQuickView. Currently, to use the Qt Quick Components there is some additional work needed if the top level element is an ApplicationWindow or Window. You can look at the source code to see how I implemented this. I basically stripped down the code from qmlscene to the minimum of what was needed for this example.

Here is the full listing for the main program, main.cpp:

#include <QApplication>
#include <QObject>
#include <QQmlComponent>
#include <QQmlEngine>
#include <QQuickWindow>
#include <QSurfaceFormat>
#include "KeyGenerator.h"

// Main wrapper program.
// Special handling is needed when using Qt Quick Controls for the top window.
// The code here is based on what qmlscene does.

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
    QApplication app(argc, argv);

    // Register our component type with QML.
    qmlRegisterType<KeyGenerator>("com.ics.demo", 1, 0, "KeyGenerator");

    int rc = 0;

    QQmlEngine engine;
    QQmlComponent *component = new QQmlComponent(&engine);

    QObject::connect(&engine, SIGNAL(quit()), QCoreApplication::instance(), SLOT(quit()));


    if (!component->isReady() ) {
        qWarning("%s", qPrintable(component->errorString()));
        return -1;

    QObject *topLevel = component->create();
    QQuickWindow *window = qobject_cast<QQuickWindow *>(topLevel);

    QSurfaceFormat surfaceFormat = window->requestedFormat();

    rc = app.exec();

    delete component;
    return rc;

In case it is not obvious, when using a module written in C++ with QML you cannot use the qmlscene program to execute your QML code because the C++ code for the module will not be linked in. If you try to do this you will get an error message that the module is not installed.