Category Archives: Hardware

Nvidia GTX 650 Ti Boost Challenge Radeon HD 7790

Jakarta – Not long after AMD launched its latest graphics processor, the Radeon HD 7790, to fill the mainstream classroom, Nvidia did not remain silent and be ready menggeber rival product through Boost GeForce GTX 650 Ti.

Naming Boost on the back of the mainstream series leads directly to the clock speed that it has, which of course has got a touch of ‘turbo’ from Nvidia. Boost rumored GTX 650 Ti GPU Boost feature.

With these features, the GTX 650 Ti Boost which actually has a clock speed of 980 MHz can dynamically increase the clock speed to 1033 MHz as needed. Moreover Boost GTX 650 Ti has 768 CUDA cores armed, 64 TMU, 24 ROP.

While the sector is supported by the use of GDDR5 memory running on a 192-bit interface that comes with a capacity of 1 GB and 2 GB respectively by Nvidia priced at USD 149 (USD 1.4 million) and USD 169 (USD 1.6 million) . Similarly, as quoted from Techpowerup, Wednesday (27/03/2013).

Logitech headsets and webcams for the business professional

As many of you know, I’m a full-time telecommuter. Although a portion of my work involves some travel, most days I am working from home, and a lot of that involves sitting on conference calls with colleagues and customers/partners.

Until recently, much of that required that I be desk-bound.

Anyone who has to work with VOIP and IP-based conferencing systems such as Skype, Microsoft Lync, Cisco WebEx and Citrix GoToMeeting knows that voice quality is everything if you’re going to have an effective business conversation.

And that means using devices that typically tie you to your desk, such as a wired headset or an Bluetooth/USB speakerphone, such as the Plantronics Callisto, which I have and think is an excellent product.

While there are many Bluetooth headsets and earpieces on the market which are perfectly suitable for mobile phone conversations, few are specifically optimized for use with PCs that have VOIP “Soft Phone” software, and do not deliver what I would regard as business critical voice quality.

They are perfectly fine for short calls, but not ideal when you are on a VOIP conference for as much as an hour at a time, or even longer, particularly when you need to be an active participant and when paying close attention to who is speaking and the clarity of what you are saying is essential.

As we all know about Bluetooth when it comes to audio streams, the farther you get away from the transceiver, the worse the audio gets. So it’s not practical to stray too far away from your PC.

Logitech’s latest wireless headsets have been a total game changer for my personal work situation since I’ve been using them the last few months. I’ve been using the H820e stereo version which retails for $199 but can be found for considerably less.

Installation and use of the headset is pretty straightforward — you plug the DECT 6.0 transmitter and charging base into a free USB port on your PC or Mac, and the AC power cord to power the base. The headset charges on the base when not in use, and has a built-in rechargeable battery.

The operating system recognizes it automatically, and depending on the VOIP program you are using, you may need to alter the settings to use the headset as your primary audio device.

If you’re familiar with the DECT 6.0 1.9Ghz wireless transmission standard, particularly if you have cordless phones in your house that use the technology, you know that you can get some pretty impressive range and not lose any voice quality. That’s exactly what the H820e headset gives you for VOIP calls.

My home office is a good 60 feet away from my living room and around 75 feet from my “breakfast area” which has my espresso machine and a table which faces my outdoor patio and pool area with outdoor furniture which is about 100 feet or so away from the base transmitter.

So regardless of what VOIP software I am using, and where I am in my house, I get the same crystal-clear voice quality as if I am sitting right in front of my PC. For example, this wearable computing podcast that I recorded with Rick Vanover of Veeam was actually done in my living room, while wearing the H820e using Skype.

So the quality of the audio is without dispute. What about the overall design and using it?

The H820e was designed for use for hours at a time. The stereo version is comfortable and after a while you forget you even have it on your head. While I am extremely pleased with the device, I have only a few nitpicks:

First, the “Mute” button is attached to the microphone boom and is recessed back towards where the headphone is. It doesn’t stick prominently out, so you have to sort of feel your way up the boom to finding it.

If you’re away from your PC and are not near the software controls of your VOIP client, and some sort of unplanned audio distraction occurs that you don’t want to be heard by everyone else, then it could take a few seconds to mute the audio while you fumble around with the boom. It would be better if in the next version of this product that they put it on the exterior side of the headphone holding the boom.

It’s a minor annoyance but it’s still an annoyance nonetheless.

The second is the boom mic’s sensitivity to airflow. Now, normally you don’t have a lot of “wind” in an indoor or office setting but in the summertime in Florida, I like to have a fan going in my office for better air circulation.

If that fan is pointed directly at me, it sounds like I am in an outdoor breeze. And if you are actually outdoors (like sitting on my patio and having a cup of coffee) and a little bit of wind picks up, you’re going to hear it if the mic isn’t muted, no question.

Also, if you are a heavy breather, you’ll probably want to have the boom twisted a lot farther away from your mouth than you think you need it.

Despite what I would call these two minor nitpicks I think the H820e is an excellent product and I heartily reccomend it. I’ve also spent some time with their wired headset, the H650e on business trips with my laptop and also on my Surface RT using Skype and Lync, and the audio is just as high quality as the H820e, provided your bandwidth supports the fidelity of the connection.

Not all telecommuting and conferencing is about audio, however. From time to time I do need to do video as well.

My corporate laptop, my Lenovo X1 Carbon is a great little machine but its webcam isn’t its strong suit. When it’s docked to my monitor on my desk at home, I need something that delivers much more robust and HD-quality video.

I’ve written about small busines and SOHO/workgroup video conferencing products before, like Logitech’s BCC950. While the BCC950 is an excellent product for small meeting rooms and for having three to five people on camera at once, it’s overkill for a telecommuter or just someone in a single office.

Enter the Logitech C930e, a “Business” webcam. Like any other webcam it clips to the top of your monitor and plugs into your USB 2.0 or 3.0 port. But this is no ordinary webcam.

At a street price of $129.00 it’s more expensive than Logitech’s consumer/prosumer webcam offerings, but there’s considerable enterprise-class video conferencing technology built-into this little device.

First, provided your bandwidth supports it, the C930e can capture 1080p video (or 15MP stills) at 30 frames a second because it includes Scalable Video Coding using H.264 and UVC 1.5, the second of which is needed to be certified for use with corporate-grade video conferencing tools.

Second, the camera has a 90-degree diagonal field of view so you get a widescreen capture of the subject without any “fish eye” distortion. You also get a Carl Zeiss lens and 4X digital zoom with software pan and tilt control, as well as built-in stereo microphones

Logitech also offers the consumer-oriented C920 which is about $30 cheaper than the C930e, but it lacks the the Scalable Video Coding and UVC 1.5 capabilities used with corporate applications like Lync and Cisco UC and is more suited towards Skype and other consumer video applications like Google Hangouts. It also lacks the 90-degree FOV of its more expensive sibling.

While the two cameras look very similar, they shouldn’t be confused with each other. If corporate video conferencing capability and quality is definitely what you need, you want the C930e.

LCD Panel Full HD Thinnest In The World For Mobile Devices From LG

Processors are getting faster, increasing the screen resolution and packaging design into its own color thinning on the development of smartphones and tablet PC technology today. With the presence of the latest innovation from LG, the trend will continue. LG introduces the thinnest Full HD display panel in the world for mobile devices. With this innovation, the body seems to be getting thinner smartphone.
LG LCDpanel 1 world slimmest Full HD LCD Panel Thinnest In The World For Mobile Devices From LG smartphone mobile gadget news
LCD Panel Full HD Thinnest In The World For Mobile Devices From LG
LG’s latest display panels present in the 5.2-inch size. There is a possibility this panel will be present in larger sizes for use on Tablet PCs. Thickness is only 2.2 mm, including the bezel or frame size 2.3 mm. The key to the success of creating a panel LG world’s thinnest LCD screen is located on LG Display panel technology, Advanced One-Glass-Solution (OGS). Even to create, LG brings touchscreen technology that is specifically designed and applied the first time through this panel.
2 LCDpanel world slimmest LG LCD Panel Full HD Thinnest In The World For Mobile Devices From LG smartphone mobile gadget news
LCD Panel Full HD Thinnest In The World For Mobile Devices From LG
So what’s the secret to this panel can be very thin? The secret lies in between the display panel and touch the film (layer touch screen). LG Dual Flexible Printed circuit inserts instead of regular single circuit. All components are then combined with Optical Clear Resin parts in between the panel and touch the film with immediate unification system. As a result, it will automatically reduce the thickness of the panel itself as much as 30 percent.
With the presence Optical Clear Resin, this new tech screen brightness can have a better screen. With a full HD screen resolution of 1920 × 1080 pixels and it has a maximum level of 535 nits brightness, the LCD screen of LG’s latest look more perfect and claimed to still be clearly visible even under the conditions used in the scorching sun.
Unfortunately, LG has not announced when the LCD screen will make her debut for smartphones and tablet PCs. Most likely we will see it the first time in LG branded products.

Logitech ® Mini Keyboard is Faithful Friend For Your iPad Mini

JAKARTA – Logitech introduced the Logitech ® Ultrathin Mini Keyboard, a keyboard cover that protects the iPad mini keyboard that comes with the elegant slim design that is specifically designed to maximize the experience of using the iPad mini.
Ultrathin Keyboard Logitech ® Mini helps in doing everything on your mini-iPad from enjoying apps, movies and photos, as well as deliver a comfortable typing experience-with its thin design, lightweight and stylish.
Kurniadih Sutanto, Indonesia Country Manager of Logitech said, Ultrathin Keyboard integral mini iPad mini. The design is smart and stylish will present a perfect protection for the screen iPad mini.
“Ultrathin Keyboard mini also offers a full-size keyboard that is integrated for a comfortable typing experience, quickly and smoothly,” he said in Jakarta, Friday (07/19/2013).
Logitech ® Keyboard Cover mini connected easily and safely with a mini iPad thanks to the availability of an integrated powerful magnetic clip. Logitech ® Keyboard Cover has a protective aluminum mini.
Products equipped with the Bluetooth button EasyType to deliver a comfortable typing experience and easy. EasyType button brings the traditional layouts in a smaller form, and accompanied by an iPad Mini shortcut keys to execute commands that are often used, such as copy, paste and other. Logitech ® Keyboard Cover mini also allows users to watch movies or videos without having to hold it with both hands.
Logitech ® Keyboard Cover mini has been equipped with features On / Off switch that makes the iPad mini can light up automatically when the cover is opened or enters standby mode when the cover is closed.
Logitech ® Keyboard Cover comes with a mini battery powered stand up to three months, making users have free time to type keyboard and not have to worry about running out of power.
Logitech ® Keyboard Cover Mini comes in black and white, and has been available in the Indonesian market with a retail price of USD 94.99 or about $ 1 million.

Almost Maximum Bandwidth, APJII Install Router Brocade

Internet users in Indonesia continues to increase. As of the end of 2012, Indonesia, which has a population of 237.5 million people has 63 million Internet users.

When compared to the condition two years ago, seen a significant surge in Internet traffic in IIX (Indonesia Internet eXchange). March 2013, the average traffic reached 10 Gigabit per second, or 4x the condition in 2010.

“As a result, our routing infrastructure that already exists is approaching maximum capacity, while Internet traffic growth shows no signs of slowing down,” said Private Harijanto (Chairman IIX).

“The main problem is about 60 percent of Indonesia’s population using mobile phones, but are accessing the Internet from the handset is still fairly small,” said Harijanto. “Obviously, this trend will change quickly. 3G infrastructure development nationwide 4G/LTE technology is almost completed and will be implemented next year. ”

Anticipating the explosion of bandwidth requirements up to 10x in the next five years, the Association of Indonesian Internet Service Providers (APJII) is now using the series routers Brocade MLXe-16 is able to support 100 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) as the main component IIX. IIX two main router was installed at different locations to ensure high availability. With the substantial spare capacity in the 16-slot chassis, APJII has ample scope to install modules with a capacity of four-port 40 GbE and two-port module with a capacity of 100 GbE in the future.

APJII also plans to apply the technology Brocade Multi-Chassis Trunking (MCT). This technology will connect the two routers on top to create a single tool that is able to generalize the traffic load on network-network service provider that has a lot of connections to the center of the Indonesian Internet Exchange.

APJII currently has 278 members, including telecommunications companies, Internet service providers and content providers. Some 161 of which have been connected to the IIX via IPv4, while 51 of them also use IPv6 connection.

Prepare Middle Acer Tablet screen Resolution WQHD With Tegra 4 CPU?

After a long time no hear, Acer reportedly serious secretly working on a new tablet model featuring support for NVIDIA Tegra 4 processor and high resolution screen.

Based on reports published by Notebook Italia on benchmark results for the latest Acer tablet with the model number of this TA272HUL reportedly has the support of NVIDIA Tegra 4 1.8GHz processor. Not only that, the new Acer tablet based on the Android 4.2.2 will also be equipped with a high screen resolution support WQHD (2560 × 1440 pixels) and 2GB of RAM.

The use of quad-core processor ARM Cortex-A15 will supposedly make the most of existing devices may have reliability and high-performance fast. Yes, that’s the least that has been disclosed in a relevant benchmark results support the processor models in Nenamark and Passmark recently.

And regardless of whether or not the existence of these rumors, unfortunately still unknown specific info from related parties so far.

Monitor Your CPU With A Real Tachometer

Whether you’re a tinkerer with a custom rig, or you just aren’t sure why your computer’s fans are running, checking your CPU usage is a pretty common task. Instead of using a boring on-screen activity monitor though, you can hook up your machine to a car tachometer for constant feedback.

This hack comes courtesy of ivancreations, who created an entire PC monitoring block from real-world components. The full instructions are on his blog and needless to say, they’re pretty complicated. If you can makes heads and tails of his plans though, the results speak for themselves.

While the tachometer is my favourite part of the build, he also wired up some LED light grids to illustrate other vital system information as well. If you think you’re up to it, or just want a closer look, be sure to check out the source link.

Lenovo ThinkPad X240S, Touch Screen 12.5 Inch Notebook With Intel Haswell CPU

The presence of the latest models of ThinkPad X240s will certainly strengthen the product line Lenovo ThinkPad Series notebooks on the market today. Along with that, a variety of retail product manuals and documents related to the latest models of Lenovo ThinkPad Series has also started popping up lately.

Lenovo ThinkPad X240S is provided by features 12.5-inch touch screen that supports a resolution of 1366 × 768 pixels. While on the power on for system support in it, Windows 8 x64-based laptop also has provided support for the option of Intel Core i7-4500U or Intel Core i5-4200U with collaboration 4GB of RAM and a 7200RPM hard drive capacity of 320GB.

With a water-resistant keyboard and a roll-cage design firm, this latest notebook also offers several business-friendly features that include SIM Card slot, the TrackPoint in the middle of the keyboard, and chasing that can be dismantled and reassembled for the purpose of adding additional components.

And even complete support for existing features, laptop-sized (305.5 × 206.5 × 19.7) mm and weighs 1.36 kg also has 720p webcam, 802.11a/b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, USB 3.0, Ethernet, D-Sub, mini DisplayPort, SDXC card reader, and a 6 Cell Lithium Polymer battery that can provide power for up to 6 hours of operation lasting duration.

Although the new soon to be released sometime in August 2013 that will come, but the Lenovo ThinkPad X240S is reportedly ready to sell for 6,498 HKD or equivalent 8.35 million per unit.

ASUS PQ321Q UltraHD Monitor Review: Living with a 31.5-inch 4K Desktop Display

Many consider me to be a 4K hater. The past few trade shows I’ve attended have been pushing it on consumers to replace their TVs, but I see less value in it. When it comes to a computer display, it is a different game. Unlike a 50” TV, we sit close to our monitors, even if they are 30” in size. We also have no worries about a lack of native content, since everything is rendered on the fly and native. There are no issues with the lack of HDMI 2.0, as DisplayPort 1.2 can drive a 3840×2160 screen at 60 Hz.

When it comes to 4K on the desktop, my main question is: how much difference will I see? ASUS is one of the first with a HiDPI display in the PQ321Q. While not truly 4K, it is a 3840×2160 LCD display that can accept an Ultra High Definition (UHD) signal over HDMI and DisplayPort. It also clocks in at a wallet-stretching $3,500 right now. The question is, are we seeing the future with displays here, or are we seeing a niche product?

What does 4K/UHD/HiDPI bring to the desktop? We’ve seen it for a few years now in smartphones and tablets, making their smaller screens more usable for reading and general work. My initial thought is more desktop space, as that is what it has meant before. With a 32” monitor and a pixel density this high, running it without any DPI scaling leads to a desktop where reading text is a huge pain. Instead I believe most users will opt for DPI scaling so elements are larger and easier to read. Now you have something similar to the Retina screen on the iPhone: No more desktop space compared to a 2560×1440 monitor, but one that is razor sharp and easier to look at.

To get to this pixel density, ASUS has relied upon a panel from Sharp that uses IGZO technology. IGZO (Indium gallium zinc oxide) is a material that replaces amorphous silicon for the active layer of an LCD screen. The main benefit is higher electron mobility that allows for faster reacting, smaller pixels. We have seen non-IGZO panels in smartphones with higher pixel densities, but we don’t have any other current desktop LCDs that offer a higher pixel density than this ASUS display. IGZO also allows for a wide viewing angle.

Monoprice 27″ IPS-G Pro LED Monitor WQHD 2560×1440

Monoprice is among the more interesting companies you probably haven’t heard of. Started out of an apartment around a decade ago, the company initially sold everything at a single price, hence the name. That business model may have worked when the product line was mostly cables and connectors, but the company now offers a diverse array that includes monitors (more in a moment), home theatre screens, graphics tablets, headphones, apocket-size pico projector, an action cam, even electric guitars – and, yes, cables, connectors and accessories as well. It’s a lineup with no seeming rhyme or reason, other than quality products at bargain prices.

And that actually is the rhyme and reason behind Monoprice products. According to CEO Ajay Kumar, the company looks for categories where vastly overpriced products predominate. That gives Monoprice room to create and sell products at dramatically lower price points, while still maintaining strong profit margins.
“We are in the right place at the right time with our business model,” says Kumar, who joined the company in July 2011. “We offer the same cable or accessory as national retail brands, but for much less cost. However, we are not cutting corners as we employ high-quality manufacturing partners who work with our specs. Our markup is much lower and we pass those savings to our customers. Monoprice brings them a value proposition they can’t find anywhere else.”
And that leads us to the Monoprice 27″ IPS-G Pro LED Monitor WQHD 2560×1440 Product ID 10489, which is what you came here for. I’ve been rocking this 16:9 (widescreen) monitor for over a month now and it’s stunning. Let’s take a look at the stats and find out why.
Start with the size, 27″. You don’t have to join Grindr to know that size matters. A larger screen means that you can work easily with more windows at once. It makes copying files and editing text and spreadsheets easier and obviously makes working with pictures and video more convenient, if that’s your thing. And if you’re a gamer, a large screen is essential. Ditto if you are, for instance, a daytrader or a designer.
Hand in glove with size is resolution. “WQHD” may sound like a Minneapolis TV station, but it means 2560 x 1440 pixels. Some 27″ screens max out at regular Full HD, which is 1920 x 1080. The higher resolution of the Monoprice unit means that more detail is visible, if your PC’s graphics card supports it. If not, you’ll be limited to 1920 x 1080 (or less, if your PC is really old). A large screen with high resolution allows you to display more information. It makes it easier to do more with your PC.
Since we’re talking graphics cards, another nice feature of the Monoprice 10489 is that it supports four different types of interface: HDMI 1.4, DVI, VGA and DisplayPort 1.2. That means that the monitor is bound to work with your existing graphics card. The package includes VGA and DVI-D cables, but these are standard length (around 6′). Because of the size of the monitor, it’s much easier to use longer cables – you can plug in the cable before maneuvering the monitor into place on your desk. Monoprice has you covered with available 15′ HDMI, DVI-D, VGA and DisplayPort 1.2 cables. Choose the one you need.
The monitor uses LEDs for the backlighting, rather than cold cathode fluorescent tubes. The benefit: more even illumination. And it uses In Plane Switching (IPS) display technology, which means you get a wide viewing angle with no color shift even when the screen is viewed at an extreme angle. Viewing angle is stated as 178 degree in both the horizontal and vertical planes.
Covering that screen is a glossy glass laminate with an antiglare coating. The antiglare coating is not a matte finish; the screen is glossy, but the antiglare coating reduces the intensity of any glare from reflected light. As with any monitor, you’ll want to position it so that ambient light is not reflected directly back at you. I’ve found the screen easy to use.
The monitor comes with a removable stand and has a 100×100 VESA mounting size for use with desk or wall mounts. The stand (which is completely removable) has rotate and tilt adjustments. It doesn’t have height adjustment, a feature found on a small number of other monitors.
The bezel is black plastic and is relatively thick. The OSD controls (brightness, etc.) are easy to reach. The connectors are in the usual awkward place for monitors, along the bottom bezel.
Several other stats are key. One is dead pixels. The monitor has over 10 million subpixels (2560 x 1440 pixels x 3 colors per pixel). If any one of those subpixels is stuck in the on or off position, you get a dead pixel – a spot that is always dark, or always white, red, reddish, green, greenish, etc. Unfortunately, dead pixels are a potential fact of life on all monitors – but Monoprice tells me they offer a zero dead pixel guarantee for a year. It’s an unusually strong guarantee, since other manufacturers often will only guarantee that the dead pixel count won’t exceed 5 or 10. The unit I received had no dead pixels.
Also important are brightness and contrast. Monoprice advertises a brightness rating of 440 cd/m², which it says is more than 15% brighter than most comparable displays, and a maximum dynamic contrast ratio of 80,000:1.
The display is indeed bright, but this is the one area where I noted a difficulty with this product – the screen is a bit too bright, even with the brightness adjustment turned down to the lowest setting. As a result, black areas on screen are rendered slightly grayish. For most people and most applications, this won’t be a problem – and it’s a phenomenon that’s scarcely unique to the Monoprice unit – but graphic designers will want to carefully compare this screen with others to see what meets their needs.
The panel features 109 pixels per inch, which translates to a 0.2331mm pixel size. The unit also includes builtin stereo speakers, which can be fed via a stereo audio cable, as well as audio from the HDMI connection. As with most builtin monitor speakers, the sound was tinny and unimpressive, so I don’t recommend using them. Buy a pair of standalone computer speakers instead.
Another stat is response time, which the company says is 6 milliseconds (gray-to-gray response time). That’s a measurement of how long it takes the monitor to change the image when the PC tells it to, and is an issue for almost no one except gamers.
Bottom line: if you’re looking for a high-quality 27″ WQHD IPS LED monitor at a great price, pick up the Monoprice 10489.